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spencer burke

Darren,

Thanks for taking the time to read the book for yourself. Interesting insights, this whole "heretics" thing seems to be coming alive... I like your thoughts about the typical emerging church and where we might see the future of church expanding to "I think that people practicing an emerging faith may not even be part of the “Emergent Conversation” or consider themselves emergent. They may form communities that are practicing a radical praxis in their quest to encounter God yet would not even be recognized as churches in the classical sense."

I look forward to more of you observations. Thanks again for reading and posting...

spencer burke

Darren,

Thanks for taking the time to read the book for yourself. Interesting insights, this whole "heretics" thing seems to be coming alive... I like your thoughts about the typical emerging church and where we might see the future of church expanding to "I think that people practicing an emerging faith may not even be part of the “Emergent Conversation” or consider themselves emergent. They may form communities that are practicing a radical praxis in their quest to encounter God yet would not even be recognized as churches in the classical sense."

I look forward to more of you observations. Thanks again for reading and posting...

John K Riordan

Darren,

I enjoyed reading your thoughts on Spencer's book. I look forward to reading it myself. I may be an irreligious heretic, maybe always have been.

You wrote: I think that people practicing an emerging faith may not even be part of the “Emergent Conversation” or consider themselves emergent.

I'm new to the emergent conversation. My interest was piqued by some reading in the science of emergence and complex dynamics, a field I find rich with theological possibilities. It reveals a world of hidden wholeness, not unlike the celtic cross you're using on your blog.

My faith is post-Catholic catholic, post-charismatic and apophatic. Emergent speaks to me. It's saying things I've been feeling, groping to express. I thought I was alone.

I see that you've been reading John of the Cross, a great influence on me. I recommend Peter Rollins' new book, How (Not) to Speak of God. He wants to bring negative theology into the heart of the emergent conversation. I agree with this suggestion, heartily.

Negative theology is a way to speak/not speak of the radical inadequacy of all God-talk, an asceticism of the heart and mind, which prepares us to encounter the Lord more authentically in silence and poverty of spirit.

Negative theology is biblical. Demonstrating this from the Scriptures is essential to the emergent theological task. Emergent is not rejecting orthodox Christian faith. It's retrieving a neglected dimension of biblical faith that can free the church from the stunting effects of dogmatic ossification.

Negative theology can help the church announce the gospel meaningfully to post-modernity. The world awaits a word out of the darkness. Everything we can say about the Lord is provisional, ad hoc, a hitchhiker's guide. Yet we dare to speak.

We foolishly dare to say, "God is love", knowing that "No eye has seen, no ear has heard, no mind has conceived what God has prepared for those who love him." (1 Cor 2:9)

John


D~

Thanks Spencer! I'm reading and will be posting more,

John ~ I'm all over the Apophatic way of knowing God. I've not posted much about it but have been teaching it in my community. Thanks for the book lead. Try reading Pseudo Dionesus - a 5th century pseudonym that is often credited with the roots of the via negativa.

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  • In the Celtic tradition "Thin Places" are places where the spiritual and the natural world intersect. It is a place where it is possible to touch and be touched by God. "Thin Spaces" are the moments when we experience a deep sense of God’s presence in our everyday world.




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